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The Satchel is OUT - WATCH NOW!

STORY

A vigorous and compelling tale of African origin about two brothers fighting for the power to create a world using an all-powerful “Satchel”. A drama-filled, entertaining story sure to leave you at the edge of your screen! Taking you to the mystical lands of “The Satchel”.

Are you going to take sides?

Find out more. 

SOUNDS

Bringing you an enchanting sonic experience taken from the cultural depths of Africa straight to your eardrums. Here is a soundtrack drawn from the west African Yoruba heritage titled “BATA” off our debut short film  “The Satchel”.
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Creele Newsletter!

Be the first to know about all Creele News, starting with our debut short film “The Satchel”!”

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History News Monthly

Bringing you FunFacts about African Art & history

Luba, Congo DR.

Luba art refers to the visual and material culture of the Luba people. Most objects were created by people living along the Lualaba River and around the lakes of the Upemba Depression, or among related peoples to the east in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
 
The artistic style of the Luba people is characterised by harmonious integration of organically related forms. Female figures are carved more often than male figures. Some are freestanding, almost always in a frontal position with their hands on their breasts; others are kneeling, sitting, or standing figures whose upraised hands serve as supports for bowls, seats, and neck rests.
A popular form consists of a kneeling or sitting female figure holding a bowl. Such mendicant figures are used to appeal to spirits for health and aid for pregnant women; neighbours, seeing the figure in front of a woman’s hut, will fill it with gifts to help her avoid hardship in pregnancy.

Luba, Congo DR.

Luba art refers to the visual and material culture of the Luba people. Most objects were created by people living along the Lualaba River and around the lakes of the Upemba Depression, or among related peoples to the east in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
 
The artistic style of the Luba people is characterised by harmonious integration of organically related forms. Female figures are carved more often than male figures. Some are freestanding, almost always in a frontal position with their hands on their breasts; others are kneeling, sitting, or standing figures whose upraised hands serve as supports for bowls, seats, and neck rests.
 
A popular form consists of a kneeling or sitting female figure holding a bowl. Such mendicant figures are used to appeal to spirits for health and aid for pregnant women; neighbours, seeing the figure in front of a woman’s hut, will fill it with gifts to help her avoid hardship in pregnancy.